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Roland Ramanan and Mark Phillips

  • theprintspace 74 Kingsland Road London E2 8DL (map)

For our September talk, we're pleased to have Roland Ramanan and Mark Phillips joining us to share their work. Roland will be talking about his ongoing project, Gillett Square, and Mark will be sharing work from his project Unbroken, on repair and reuse – and the people behind it.

Please come and join us for a great evening of photography and discussion. As always, PhotoForum is free and open to all. Doors open at 7:00PM for a prompt 7:30PM start.

© Roland Ramanan

© Roland Ramanan

Roland Ramanan is a teacher and musician based in London. He developed a passion for photography around 2010, initially through street photography. He is a local coordinator for the London Independent Photography organisation and his work has featured in a number of their annual exhibitions. In 2012, he started a long term documentary project on a vulnerable group of people who gravitate towards a corner of east London called Gillett square.

Gillett Square is a unique space in Hackney, East London – an experiment in community regeneration with a complex and delicate eco-system. Over the last seven years, Roland has photographed and recorded the lives that float in and around the square. Lives full of addiction and pain, but, also of hope and optimism. The work has been featured in Vice magazine and more recently in a group show at the Espacio Gallery in London.

© Mark Phillips

© Mark Phillips

Mark Phillips originally studied engineering and has a PhD researching innovation and social ecosystems. He is based in Buckinghamshire and splits his time between working with start-ups and undertaking long-term documentary projects. His work has been published in the i newspaper and magazines, and exhibited at theprintspace, ShutterHub and Sony World Photography Awards.

His current long-term project, Unbroken, explores an important contributor to addressing environmental issues and creating a sustainable future — repair and reuse. Repair and reuse enables our ‘things’ to last longer, use less of the world’s resources and create less waste. Taking a constructive approach to this global issue, the project sheds light on the community of global ‘repairers’ or ‘fixers’, sharing skills and knowledge to provide solutions. One more fix; one thing unbroken, one less problem.

Earlier Event: August 13
Louis Leeson and Antonio Olmos